This Week in Music to Work to - August 28th, 2014


This week was going to be the new trailer for the home page of music2work2 but after fighting the video editor, I’m guessing it’s going to be next week!

Only one study then…

Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews

Well thought out and presented article that looks at the neuroscience and psychology behind our attachment to the songs from our youth.  If you’ve ever wondered why certain tracks stay with you after all these years - have a read - well worth it!

#musictoworkto


Written while listening to: Fibonacci Series Playlist

Why do we love the music we heard as teenagers? - Bubblews

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

As I plod through my 20s, I’ve noticed a strange phenomenon: The music I loved as a teenager means more to me than ever—but with each passing year…

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Well thought out and presented article that looks at the neuroscience and psychology behind our attachment to the songs from our youth.  If you’ve ever wondered why certain tracks stay with you after all these years - have a read - well worth it!


See on bubblews.com

Mozart as Medicine: The Health Benefits of Music

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

Learn about the health benefits of music and how to use music therapy to relieve stress, reduce pain, and improve your health.

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Long but well put together article that looks at the current research on music therapy.  The main takeaway is that the majority of studies are flawed and don’t really define how the clear benefits associated with music therapy are attributed.  More research is needed - but there is the final point - that undoubtedly music does have a positive benefit and unlike all the pills and other procedures - there are no negative side effects!


See on jamesclear.com

This Week in Music to Work to - August 14th, 2014


Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies

I love this study - researchers showed that children as young as 14 months can be influenced to exhibit spontaneous helping behavior if they have previously engaged in synchronous behavior with the object of their assistance!  read the article for the details but the takeaway for me is that it isn’t necessarily about music - the researchers reckoned that music probably wasn’t necessary - what was necessary was the movement and visual recognition that another human being was moving in the same way as them.  What music was doing here was to deliver the auditory cues on when to move - and that for me is a huge insight into how music affects us.  It’s often not that music has some special magic that makes things happen - it’s that music is so prevalent and we’re so used to acting on its inherent nature (i.e rhythm, beat, melody, mood, bass lines) that its our actions that are the cause but we attribute them to music.

 

5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace

Nice overview on music in the workplace - complete with some listening recommendations - The Simcity 4 soundtrack is a favorite for many knowledge workers


Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches

Headaches are horrible and dealing with them can be a nightmare.  This article looks at relaxation techniques which have been shown to help people suffering from headaches and migraines.  One of the recommendations is to use calming music in the background - which makes sense so long as it isn’t “loud” music!  Some music2work2 would be perfect for this.


This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible

This one has been making the rounds this week for obvious reasons.  If just listening to music can make you feel and act more powerful then that’s pretty good information to have.  the study isolated the driver to be heavy bass beats in the tracks which has certainly been a major growth area in popular music over the last decade or so.  Nothing terribly new here - athletes and competitors of all kinds have used music to pump themselves up before an event - it’s just interesting to see that one specific aspect of the music - the bass - can have such an impact.


#musictoworkto #musicandpain #workmusic #musicatwork


​Written while listening to: Drive (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)




Bouncing to the Beatles Breeds Benevolent Babies

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

Canadian researchers find synchronized movement to music can inspire altruism in 14-month-old infants.

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

I love this study - researchers showed that children as young as 14 months can be influenced to exhibit spontaneous helping behavior if they have previously engaged in synchronous behavior with the object of their assistance!  read the article for the details but the takeaway for me is that it isn’t necessarily about music - the researchers reckoned that music probably wasn’t necessary - what was necessary was the movement and visual recognition that another human being was moving in the same way as them.  What music was doing here was to deliver the auditory cues on when to move - and that for me is a huge insight into how music affects us.  It’s often not that music has some special magic that makes things happen - it’s that music is so prevalent and we’re so used to acting on its inherent nature (i.e rhythm, beat, melody, mood, bass lines) that its our actions that are the cause but we attribute them to music.  


See on psmag.com

5 Ways to Incorporate Music into the Workplace

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to


Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Nice overview on music in the workplace - complete with some listening recommendations - The Simcity 4 soundtrack is a favorite for many knowledge workers


See on danjur.com

This Music Will Make You Feel Invincible

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

By Tom Jacobs

As its recent reincarnation on Broadway reminded us, you can’t separate Rocky from its music. It’s easy to believe the lovable underdog boxer could be a champion, so long as that rousing, brass-heavy score is roaring as…

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

This one has been making the rounds this week for obvious reasons.  If just listening to music can make you feel and act more powerful then that’s pretty good information to have.  the study isolated the driver to be heavy bass beats in the tracks which has certainly been a major growth area in popular music over the last decade or so.  Nothing terribly new here - athletes and competitors of all kinds have used music to pump themselves up before an event - it’s just interesting to see that one specific aspect of the music - the bass - can have such an impact.


See on huffingtonpost.com

Relaxation Techniques for Migraines and Headaches

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

Learning relaxation techniques is an important part of migraine and headache relief. Read these tips.

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Headaches are horrible and dealing with them can be a nightmare.  This article looks at relaxation techniques which have been shown to help people suffering from headaches and migraines.  One of the recommendations is to use calming music in the background - which makes sense so long as it isn’t “loud” music!  Some music2work2 would be perfect for this.


See on webmd.com

Listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

Distraction is an effective pain reliever, and a new study concludes that listening to music can be effective for reducing pain in high-anxiety persons who can easily become absorbed in cognitive activities.

Andrew McCluskey's insight:

Interesting study with decent sample size of 145 subjects that experienced controlled pain while focusing on music.   The idea is that music helps reduce pain because it activates sensory pathways that compete with the pain pathways and the data seems to back this up.  What was super interesting was that they got the participants to rank their anxiety about the pain before hand and had hypothesized that those with high anxiety with the pain would be least affected by the music.  Turns out the opposite - apparently the more anxious you are about the pain - the more likely it is that the music will have a positive and soothing effect. 

Image credit: Quinn Dombrowski - Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/photos/quinnanya/5151278314


See on sciencedaily.com

How music prevents organ rejection

See on Scoop.it - Music to work to

Music has a fundamental affect on humans. It can reduce stress, enhance relaxation, provide a distraction from pain, and improve the results of clinical therapy.

MUSIC: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=music


Andrew McCluskey's insight:

research from Japan on Mice - the only thing you need to know is this:


"They found that opera and classical music both increased the time before the transplanted organs failed, but single frequency monotones and new age music did not."


take that Yanni!


;-p


See on eurekalert.org